IMPORTANT: In issues of oral health and dental care you should ensure your treatment, care, and support is provided by qualified and experienced health professionals. Check the register of the New Zealand Medical Council for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (OMS) (Click here) and the register of the Dental Council of New Zealand for dentists, and prosthodontists.(Click here) Ensure the right health professional with the rights skills, and expertise is providing advice and services for your safety, health and well being. Be aware that this advice from the Ministry of Health does not include OMS that are registered with the Dental Council ONLY. https://www.govt.nz/browse/health/gps-and-prescriptions/seeing-a-specialist

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You know the feeling. You forgot your water bottle so you dash into the dairy to get a new one. You’re annoyed because bottled water is expensive and you have five empty bottles stashed at home.

When you approach the shopkeeper, you can barely talk

After surgery and/or radiotherapy, many of us have problems with dry mouth and oral hygiene. 

It can be hard to clean the teeth adequately when you have trismus.

You know that feeling where you go for a walk in the cold wind and you breathe through y

130680706?profile=RESIZE_710xHere are some instructions and information about using Oral 7 mouth care products. I have put these together after talking with the company rep, an oral medicine specialist and people on the Oral Cancer Foundation.

Biotene used to be the go-to produc

A summary of a talk given the Auckland Support Group in October 2015

Dr Kim Gear from Oral Health gave an interesting talk which sparked some animated discussion.

Below is a summary of her points and the issues raised by patients.

Radiotherapy, Kim s

Our goal is to help those affected by head and neck cancer to successfully manage oral care during treatment, and support their overall recovery. We have collated information from various sources to support you through your treatment.

Dental problems are common following treatment for head and neck cancer, particularly if treatment has had an impact on your salivary glands. Saliva helps to remove bacteria from your mouth so when it is not produced, bacteria stays on your teeth fo

We will put more formal resources up soon but what I have learnt from many talks at the Auckland meetings is the following 

  • Have a thorough dental check up before treatment by surgery or surgery and radiation. They will probably give you the big den

Dental and Oral Care

Before treatment we advise you to review these resources. We know that head and neck cancer patients can have many dental and oral care issues. We provide resources:

Before Treatment

During Treatment

After Treatment