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Weekly Wednesday 14 November 2018

Guideline recommending removal of half the thyroid gland benefits thyroid cancer patients

BOSTON: Thyroid cancer is the most rapidly increasing cancer in the United States, with around 63,000 new cases diagnosed annually and more than 600,000 Americans living with a previous diagnosis, the American Cancer Society reports.* Traditionally, the vast majority of these patients undergo complete removal of the thyroid gland--known as a total thyroidectomy--to treat their cancer rather than the less invasive hemithyroidectomy, which involves removal of half of the gland. However, since 2015 the number of patients undergoing a hemithyroidectomy has increased significantly among a large group of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®). This shift to less invasive surgical treatment is most likely due in part to a leading medical society in the field revising its clinical guidelines that elevated hemithyroidectomy to an equal status with complete removal of the gland, according to study results presented at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2018. Read more...

 

Head and neck cancer congress going to Brisbane

International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies event will take place on the east coast of Australia in 2026.

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre

Brisbane is set to welcome 2,000 of the world’s leading cancer experts in a first-time event for Australia.

The World Congress of the International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies (IFHNOS) will take place at the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre (BCEC) in 2026. Read more...

Treatment Delays May Mean Worse Survival in Head and Neck Cancer


Prolonged postoperative and radiation intervals were associated with worse survival outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer.

An observational study showed that prolonged postoperative and radiation intervals were associated with worse survival outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) who underwent definitive surgery with a full course of radiation.1 The study findings were published in Cancer.

“Advances in subspecialty head and neck cancer care have led to increased complexities in execution,” the study authors wrote. “Multidisciplinary evaluation, modern surgical reconstruction, and sophisticated radiation planning have individually improved outcomes, but at the potential cost of lengthy delays.” Read more....

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