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When things go wrong

Quote:

“Members of the public have the right to contact professional associations to ask what is required of their members, particularly in terms of qualifications, continuing professional development and code of practice. Members of the public can also contact a professional association to ask if a particular practitioner is a member of that association.”

Did you know that you can make a report yourself, as a patient, family member or carer, directly to the Health Quality and Safety Commission (HQSC) if you think that your case should be reported as "Serious Adverse Event" ?

The Health Quality & Safety Commission may have a common law duty to refer adverse events to other agencies in situations where it is necessary to protect and promote public health and safety. The Health Quality & Safety Commission will be transparent, open and inclusive with affected health and disability service providers when discharging this duty.

If things go badly and the medical professional has not complied with this policy then don't wait for somebody else to make the report, do it yourself.  Read the following information for policy, making a report, etc:

https://www.hqsc.govt.nz/assets/Reportable-Events/Publications/National_Adverse_Events_Policy_2017/National_Adverse_Events_Policy_2017_WEB_FINAL.pdf

https://www.hqsc.govt.nz/our-programmes/adverse-events/

http://www.medsafe.govt.nz/regulatory/DevicesNew/9AdverseEvent.asp

In Australia, 'Adverse Event' refers generically to medical errors of all kinds, surgical, medical or nursing related.  An “adverse event “(AE) is any untoward medical occurrence in a patient or clinical investigation subject administered a pharmaceutical product and which does not necessarily have a causal relationship with this treatment.  An adverse event (AE) can therefore be any unfavourable and unintended sign (including an abnormal laboratory finding), symptom, or disease temporally associated with the use of a medicinal (investigational) product, whether or not related to the medicinal (investigational) product.

Adverse events categorized as "serious" (resulting in death, illness requiring hospitalization, events deemed life-threatening, results in persistent or significant disability/incapacity or medically important condition) must be reported to the regulatory authorities immediately, whereas non-serious adverse events are merely documented in the annual summary sent to the regulatory authority.

You may well say that you have a right to complain, but do you have the right to that complaint being investigated ?  No, beleive it or not, you don't.

G M Rigg